Lazarus and the Tenured Librarian

kateoplis:

What do you call a wood-fired hot tub which you can sail with or without water? A HotTug of course. Get to ordering.

Ha!

kateoplis:

Ladies & Gents: the winner of tonight’s debate. 

kateoplis:

Ladies & Gents: the winner of tonight’s debate. 

unexpectedtech:

Making the Kinect ‘finger-precise’

3Gear Systems has announced a software development kit for adding gestures to applications, using your entire hand (fingers, thumbs, wrists and all) for user interaction.

“This is especially useful when you’re doing something 3D, say assembling 3D parts in Computer Aided Design (CAD), flying through a medical 3D MRI scan, or playing 3D games.

“With the rise of 3D printing and the Maker community, we’re especially interested in making it easier to create in 3D.”

3Gear Systems is using 3D camera hardware (e.g., the Microsoft Kinect) to make this possible.

First pointing system, invented by Doug Englebart, 1967 (credit: SRI International)

However, existing Kinect software only works on large, full-body motions.

So they’ve developed software that creates a finger-precise representation of what your hands are doing, capturing tiny motions of your index finger and subtle movements of the wrist.

This means your applications can use small, comfortable gestures such as pinching and pointing rather than sweeping arm motions, as with the standard Kinect software.

They developed new computer graphics algorithms for reconstructing the precise pose of the user’s hands from 3D cameras.

A key component of the algorithm is to use a database of pre-computed 3D images corresponding to each possible hand configuration in the workspace.

http://youtu.be/UmCcYfVXZ5w

unexpectedtech:

Inspired by a pillar of antiquity, the Library of Alexandria, Brewster Kahle has a grand vision for the Internet Archive, the giant aggregator and digitizer of data, which he founded and leads.

“We want to collect all the books, music and video that has ever been produced by humans,” Mr. Kahle said.

 As of Tuesday, the archive’s online collection will include every morsel of news produced in the last three years by 20 different channels, encompassing more than 1,000 news series that have generated more than 350,000 separate programs devoted to news.

The latest ambitious effort by the archive, which has already digitized millions of books and tried to collect everything published on every Web page for the last 15 years (that adds up to more than 150 billion Web pages), is intended not only for researchers, Mr. Kahle said, but also for average citizens who make up some of the site’s estimated two million visitors each day.  “The focus is to help the American voter to better be able to examine candidates and issues,” Mr. Kahle said. “If you want to know exactly what Mitt Romney said about health care in 2009, you’ll be able to find it.”

 Of course, if you want to discredit or satirize a politician based on a clip showing some reversal of a position, that will be made easier as well. Or, as Mr. Kahle put it, “Let a thousand Jon Stewarts bloom.”

 Many conventional news outlets will be available, including CNN, Fox News, NBC News, PBS, and every purveyor of eyewitness news on local television stations. And Mr. Stewart’s program, “The Daily Show” is one of those 1,000 series that is part of the new news archive.

“Absolutely,” Mr. Kahle said. “We think of it as news.”

The Internet Archive has been quietly recording the news material from all these outlets, which means, Mr. Kahle said, capturing not only every edition of “60 Minutes” on CBS but also every minute of every day on CNN.

All of this will be available, free, to those willing to dive into the archive starting Tuesday. Mr. Kahle said the method for the search for information would be the closed-captioned words that have accompanied the news programs. The user simply plugs in the words of the search, along with some kind of time frame, and matches of news clips will appear.

Wow. Just wow.

catsbeaversandducks:

“Oh, great… A mustache… Thank you. That’s all I needed here.”
Photo via Imgur

catsbeaversandducks:

“Oh, great… A mustache… Thank you. That’s all I needed here.”

Photo via Imgur

kateoplis:

Ang Lee meets Ingmar Bergman for the first time.

Good God people, I’m only human. 

cogni-zance:

“Nothing is softer or more flexible then water”, with the exception of morality. 

It appears flexible morals aren’t simply reserved for Johnnie Cochran and Nick Naylor.  A new study led by Lars Hall and research associates from Lund University reveals how flimsy our ethical impositions truly are. In this social experiment, results demonstrated that, shortly after expressing a moral view about a difficult topic, more then half the participant pool more easily endorsed the opposite view and remained blind to the psychological mismatch.

We created a self-transforming paper survey of moral opinions, covering both foundational principles, and current dilemmas hotly debated in the media. This survey ‘magically’ exposed participants to a reversal of their previously stated attitudes, allowing us to record whether they were prepared to endorse and argue for the opposite view of what they had stated only moments ago. The result showed that the majority of the reversals remained undetected, and a full 69% of the participants failed to detect at least one of two changes. In addition, participants often constructed coherent and unequivocal arguments supporting the opposite of their original position. These results suggest a dramatic potential for flexibility in our moral attitudes, and indicates a clear role for self-attribution and post-hoc rationalization in attitude formation and change.

alecshao:

Peter Zimmermannp - Blob Paintings (2011)

nokkasili:

86

Hobbits.

nokkasili:

86

Hobbits.

staceythinx:

The series Wonderland is photographer Kirsty Mitchell’s tribute to her bookworm mother.

Mitchell on her work:

My mother was an English teacher and spent over thirty years inspiring generations of children with her stories and plays. She was rarely seen without her head in a book, or writing in her own vast diaries, which she had kept since I was young. She was lost to a brain tumour that left her too ill to be brought home to England from the small French village where she and my father had retired. Instead of a funeral full of her ex pupils, we had to make do with a tiny family gathering which left me heart broken, and needing to do something that would never let her be forgotten.

Continue reading…

(h/t L’acte Gratuit)

Love the story, the paintings, all of it.